Arch+ The Property Issue. Politics of Space and Data

“Philosophers have only interpreted the world in various ways; but what matters is to transform it.” The famous Eleventh Thesis on Feuerbach by Karl Marx suggests that there is a clear difference between abstract theorizing and revolutionary action. The apparent opposition between reflection and action, between theory and practice, was retroactively reinforced in the version edited by Friedrich Engels, in which he added the word “but” to the sentence. Through an interpretive intervention he thus underscores the merit of action. But is Marx truly concerned with the difference between philosophizing about the world and changing it? Or is he rather hinting that we should take philosophers at their word if we want to achieve the objectives they show us with their analyses? If our ultimate aim is the emancipation of all humanity, then we must try to find the inherent potential for liberation within the societal conditions, however difficult they may be at present, and “force them to dance,” as Marx writes elsewhere. And that is what this publication is about—with regard to a fundamental contradiction in contemporary society: the contradiction between the social character of production and the private appropriation of the results of this production. Specifically, it deals with the question of ownership of land and data, and the effects of these ownership relations on the production of space.

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Who owns the land? This question is of crucial importance for all societies and their coexistence. This is because the availability of land and property controls the production of space and the social order. The fact that land (space) is as vital to life as air and water means that its use should not succumb to the unmistakable play of free (market) forces and individual whims.

Who owns data? For urban planning, the issue of data ownership has become just as relevant as land ownership. In this issue we therefore discuss the politics of space and the politics of data, the real and virtual capital of the city of the future. The debate is guided by two main questions: How do we deal with space and data as planning resources? And what role do architects and urban planners play in the digital society? Read less

Category
Publication
Year
2020
Author(s)
ARCH+ with Arno Brandlhuber, Olaf Grawert (s+, DARCH, ETH Zurich)
Team
Arno Brandlhuber, Michaela Friedberg, Olaf Grawert, Anna MacIver-Ek (s+); Kristof Croes, David Djuric, Jakob Eden, Angelika Hinterbrandner, Annalena Morra, Peter Richter, Anna Yeboah (b+); Ilkin Akpinar, Frederick Coulomb, Nora Dünser, Nils Fröhling, Mirko Gatti, Dorothee Hahn, Christian Hiller, Angelika Hinterbrandner, Max Kaldenhoff, Melissa Koch, Alexandra Nehmer, Anh-Linh Ngo, Christine Rüb, Lorenz Seidl, Alexander Stumm, Jan Westerheide (ARCH+)
Contributor(s)
Ilkin Akpinar, Christian von Borries, Arno Brandlhuber, Benjamin H. Bratton, James Bridle, Callum Cant, Kristof Croes, David Djuric, Egbert Dransfeld, Michaela Friedberg, Renée Gailhoustet, Antoine Geiger, Marisa González, Hannes Grassegger, Olaf Grawert, Dennis Häusler, Florian Hertweck, Markus Hesse, Ludger Hovestadt, Immo Klink, Anastasia Kubrak, Niklas Maak, Sander Manse, Shannon Mattern, Oksana Mironova, Johannes Rebsamen, Raquel Rolnik, Christopher Roth, Wolfgang Scheppe, Trebor Scholz, Patrik Schumacher, Lorenz Seidl, Manuel Shvartzberg Carrió, Deane Simpson, Douglas Spencer, Nick Srnicek, Robert Thum, Milica Topalović, Harald Trapp, Hans-Jochen Vogel, Robert Voit, Matthias Vollmer, Bianca Wylie
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré
© ARCH+, Design: Meiré und Meiré